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Payments

Legal Services Payments Structures


I offer multiple legal services payments to best suit my clients’ needs. I work on a contingency fee basis, a flat fee, a hybrid fee, and hourly fees. Options will vary whether you are a plaintiff or a defendant in a case. But I work with clients to help them begin case activity immediately.

Hourly Fee

Clients pay an hourly rate for a case.

Hybrid Fee

Clients pay a combination of an hourly rate and a contingency fee for a case.

Contingency Fee

Clients pay attorney fees after a case is completed and when it pays out. 

Contingency fee  means that the client pays legal fees when the lawyer and case brings in money from the legal actions taken. Reed immediately begins work on the case to pursue a legal action. Clients meanwhile are not billed, have to write a check, or pay by credit card to get a case moving. Every case is reviewed and there is no guarantee that it will qualify or be accepted as a contingency fee case, but you can find out through talking with Reed.

Contingency fee cases are available for business litigation, and for trust and estate litigation cases.

Flat Fee

Clients pay attorney fees for a project fee where an amount is set based on the work expected for a case.

Payments FAQs

What is a contingency fee? A contingency fee structure means that I do not collect any attorney’s fees unless I make a recovery for the client. Essentially it means that if we don’t win I don’t get paid. The contingency fee is a percentage that my client and I would agree to at the beginning of the case and that I would collect once I collect money from the case. A Contingency Fee structure is generally applied to plaintiffs in a lawsuit. But I offer this to defendant clients.

The next fee structure I offer is a flat fee. The flat fee would be negotiated with the client at the beginning of the case where the client would pay me in advance and I would complete the entire case for that negotiated amount. A Flat Fee structure can be used for both plaintiffs and defendants in a lawsuit.

The next fee structure I provide is an hourly fee. The hourly fee is simply my fee charged for the amount of time I work on the client’s files. My invoices are then provided to the client on a monthly basis for payment. An Hourly Fee structure can be used for both plaintiffs and defendants.

The final fee structure I provide is what is referred to as a hybrid fee. This type of fee structure is often used in the context of representing a plaintiff, or perhaps representing a counter-plaintiff where someone has been sued but has a counterclaim.

And the hybrid fee combines the aspects of the hourly fee agreement and the contingency fee agreement. Typically the hybrid fee agreement bills at a lower hourly rate and combines that with a percentage recovery if we are successful in either our claim or counterclaim.

One of the benefits in working with attorney Reed Bloodworth is that he’s able to take client cases on contingency. This is known as accepting cases on a contingency fee basis.

In short this means that you don’t pay unless Reed collects on a case in a settlement or in a courtroom for a client. Of course your case is evaluated and if accepted, you’re not putting money down, or paying a lump sum to get started, and you’re not billed monthly.

When the case ends and there is a financial payout, you’ll pay Reed for the case. The payment is contingent–dependent upon–Reed’s ability to get the case settled, or getting a decision in court with a payment to you the client. Then, Reed is paid. If there is no money earned from the case, you won’t pay. The risk is placed on the law firm in taking the case.

My clients don’t have to come up with a large retainer for legal work to get started because I do work on a contingency fee basis for accepted plaintiff and defendant cases.

It’s unusual to offer contingency fees for business litigation, probate litigation, and trust litigation. Most people are familiar with personal injury cases being paid for through contingency fees. However, I offer business, probate and trust and estate litigation cases on contingency.

My clients don’t have to come up with a large retainer for legal work to get started because I do work on a contingency fee basis for accepted plaintiff cases.

It’s unusual to offer contingency fees for business litigation and trust and estate litigation. Most people are familiar with personal injury cases being paid for through contingency fees. However, I offer business, probate and trust and estate litigation cases on contingency.

A Contingency Fee means that your payment is contingent upon me, the attorney, collecting money from a completed case. Clients pay no fees upfront in a contingency fee case, nor are clients billed for monthly payments. Clients pay attorney’s fees when the case is over and only if I, the attorney, have won the case. A performance-based lawsuit changes the dynamic of any legal case. I have to collect funds from a completed case that pays out, ending the lawsuit with the person or party who a client has a legal dispute.

Contingency fees are helpful to both consumers and to attorneys who have cases that cannot proceed without a retainer. An attorney can send me a contingency fee case because our firm is able to take cases on after carefully vetting the cases. We can handle cases while the client pays later. The client doesn’t pay money to an attorney upfront. We sign an agreement stipulating the legal agreement in a contingency fee case.

I work with many attorneys practicing business litigation, trust and estate litigation and lawyers who refer personal injury cases. I get to work immediately and handle the case until there is a settlement, a trial, or a mediation to bring in the monies from the lawsuit or case. Then, and only then, will the client pay the law firm. And if there is no money rewarded, the client doesn’t pay. Filing a lawsuit is a serious decision and the person representing you should have experience in those areas of law. An attorney who spends a good portion of their time in courtrooms in front of judges and juries.

Equally as important is the ability to negotiate and settle a legal issue before it gets to court. Everyone wants a fighter, a lawyer who will fight for their rights. But what they really want and need is a skilled litigator who knows the law, knows how to apply it, and negotiate if, and when, possible for the best outcome in accordance with the clients’ desired goals.